Miscellaneous SPELLJAMMER Rules

Tons and Hull Points

There are two definitions of Tons in the Spelljamming universe. There are Ship (Displacement) Tons and there are Cargo Tons. A Ship Ton is 2,700 cu ft. A Cargo Ton is 1,000 cu ft.

A ship can sustain 10 hull points of damage per ton before it breaks up.

Damage

One point of fire inflicts 5 hull points of damage per spelljamming round.

Rams inflict 1 hull point of damage per two tons of the attacking ship times the adjusted SR (see the WCC). To living creatures, they do 1d6 hit points of damage for every hull point they would have caused, up to a maximum of 6d6.

Crashes

Every being involved in a crash must save vs. death magic or perish. Those that save still suffer 2d6 points of damage (crew sections that save receive 1d2 Hit Dice damage for every crewmember in the section). All items aboard a crashing ship must save vs. crushing blow or be destroyed.

Helms

Fighter helm:   up to 10 tons
        Minor:  10,000 sp       Major:  15,000 sp       Furnace:  6,000 sp
        Lifejammer:  8,000 sp   Cloaking:  25,000 sp    Bardic:  20,000 sp
Sloop helm:     up to 20 tons
        Minor:  20,000 sp       Major:  30,000 sp       Furnace:  12,000 sp
        Lifejammer:  16,000 sp  Cloaking:  50,000 sp    Bardic:  40,000 sp
Schooner helm:  up to 30 tons
        Minor:  30,000 sp       Major:  45,000 sp       Furnace:  18,000 sp
        Lifejammer:  24,000 sp  Cloaking:  75,000 sp    Bardic:  60,000 sp
Frigate helm:   up to 40 tons
        Minor:  40,000 sp       Major:  60,000 sp       Furnace:  24,000 sp
        Lifejammer:  32,000 sp  Cloaking:  100,000 sp   Bardic:  80,000 sp
Corvette helm:  up to 50 tons
        Minor:  50,000 sp       Major:  75,000 sp       Furnace:  30,000 sp
        Lifejammer:  40,000 sp  Cloaking:  125,000 sp   Bardic:  100,000 sp
War helm:       up to 100 tons
        Minor:  100,000 sp      Major:  150,000 sp      Furnace:  60,000 sp
        Lifejammer:  80,000 sp  Cloaking:  250,000 sp   Bardic:  200,000 sp

Crown of the Stars: 75,000 sp (up to 50 tons, SR as a minor helm)./> Forge: 500,000 sp + 100,000 sp/year (300-700 tons, SR 1-3)./> Flitter helm: 500 sp (up to 1 ton, SR 2, no spelljamming speeds)./> Gnomish helm: half the cost of a minor helm (SR as a minor helm)./> Grand helm: 1,000,000 sp./> Nonmagical helm: 250 sp/ton (SR 1, no spelljamming speeds)./> Orbus: 25,000 sp each (up to 10 tons per orbus, 1 SR per orbus, maximum of 6 orbi)./> Pool helm: 200,000 sp (up to 100 tons, SR 5)./> Pump drive: double the cost of a major helm./> Series helm: 20,000 sp each (up to 50 tons, 1 SR per helm, maximum of 5 helms).

Air

A ship holds can hold a maximum of breathable air equal to 8 times it's tonnage. One man-sized creature uses up one ton of breathable air each month. As long as the amount of breathable air is more than half the maximum, the air quality of the ship is considered fresh. As soon as it drops to half it's maximum or less, the air quality becomes fouled and will stay that way as long as there is at least some amount of breathable air on board. Should that amount be depleted as well, the air quality becomes deadly.

One ton of green plants produces five tons of breathable air per month. However, unless those plants are alchemy plants, they will need a good deal of sunshine. One ton of plants also uses up as much water as would one human.

Armament

The Standard Armament of a ship reflects the number of armaments that can be built directly into it (excluding rams). Further additions can be made with each large weapon eating up one, two, or four tons of cargo space (light, medium, or heavy weapons, respectively). Large weapons can continue be added as long as there is cargo space left and the additional armaments donot exceed one-half of the Ship's Tonnage (rounded to the nearest whole number).

Helm Conditions And The Possibilities Of Breakdown

Most brand new helms have a starting condition rating of 100. Every time it takes damage, drop the condition by 1% for every point of damage taken. Used helms generally have a condition of [1d6+4]x10% (gnomish helms rate at 1d4x10%).

Removing a helm requires shipwright or engineering proficiency and 1d8 turns to perform. A failed proficiency check reduces the helm's condition by 1d100 points - possibly destroying the helm in the process. (Installing a helm is a lot easier and does not require any kind of proficiency, though it still takes about a turn to securely bolt the helm to the deck.) Regardless of success, there's always at least a 1% drop. Any helm removed by untrained hands always has its condition reduced by 1d100 points; removal in this way takes only one turn. Any and all helms aboard a ship that breaks up have their conditions reduced by 1d100 points each as well. Should a ship break up because of a crash, any helm aboard must succeed a saving throw or be destroyed, in the regular fashion; even if it does make its saving throws, its condition is still permanently reduced by 1d100 points.

Orbi are a special case here. Damage sustained does not reduce their condition in any way - the orbi is either alive and working, or dead. Orbi involved in a crash are treated like any other living being would be.

In general, a used helm for sale can fetch (1d12-2) x 5% of its original value, provided its condition falls into the range of 50% to 100%. (Note that the price is not influenced by the actual condition within that range, for while it is quite easy to distinguish a botched or ruined helm from a solidly working one, it is quite impossible to make a more acurate estimate of the damage done.) Trying to sell a helm in a remote yard reduces this even further (DM's discretion).

As soon as a helm's condition drops below 50%, it begins to experience chances of malfunction. Each time it tries to accelerate (either to a higher SR or from tactical to cruising speed), there is a 20% chance that it will shut down for 2d4 turns altogether. This chance is the same as for gnomish helms. Note however, that most gnomish helm are merely constructed around a faulty helm (those that are not somehow work on their own - or don't work at all) and usually have two to eight repair gnomes around for situations like this. For each repair gnome beyond the first, there is a 5% chance (40% maximum) each round, that they'll get a gnomish helm (and a gnomish helm only!!) going again. Helms in this condition are obviously botched and are usually abandoned, waiting for some tinker gnome to pick them up and grant them a new life.

One final note: as soon as a helm is destroyed (ie it's condition drops to 0%) it falls into pieces and the materials it was made of disintegrate into useless scrap.

Visibility Ranges

Size            Movement        Spotted         Type            ID              Detail
Tiny            1 hex           same hex        boarding range  boarding range  shipboard
Small           2 hexes         1 hex           same hex        boarding range  boarding range
Medium          3 hexes         2 hexes         1 hex           same hex        boarding range
Large           6 hexes         4 hexes         2 hexes         same hex        boarding range
Huge            12 hexes        8 hexes         4 hexes         1 hex           same hex
Gargantuan      24 hexes        16 hexes        10 hexes        2 hexes         1 hex

Movement: The maximum range at which an object of the given size can be seen, if it is moving. Even if it is moving, all that can be seen is a moving object. It's impossible to tell what it is or what it is doing.

Spotted: At this range, both moving and stationary objects of the given size can be spotted. General shape and size can be determined, but exact identifications are impossible. It is not likely that the type of the object can be identified at his range, unless it has a very unique shape.

Type: General identifications can be made. Size, shape, color, type, and weapons are all distinguishable. Individual object still cannot be identified, unless they are distinctively marked or separated from the rest of the group. Livery and heraldic symbols or banners can be seen if large and bold. Most coats of arms cannot be distinguished at this distance. General actions can be ascertained with confidence.

ID: Individual objects of the given size can be identified. Coats of arms are clear. Most actions are clearly seen, although small events are unclear.

Detail: All details but the smallest are clear. Emotions and actions are clearly seen.


Ship Design And Construction

Basic Ship Stats

Base Cost indicates the amount of money needed to construct 1/2 (one half) ton of ship of the listed material. Usually, ships will be sold for more than their actual building cost (including any adjustment above and beyond the bare hull cost), depending on circumstances, but never less. Used ships go for 50% to 100% ([1d6+4]x10%) of their total value, provided they are in good condition. Later modifications to a ship usually don't influence its price, unless they are magical. The Base Cost does not include any rams or standard armament - just the hull. Base Time is the number of days required for construction per ton of ship. Repair Cost gives a cost multiplier for repairs to a ship of the listed material. General Availability gives the chance of having access on a site to enough of the given material to build up to 100 tons of ship. Reduce the General Availability by one step for amounts of up to 200 tons, by two steps for up to 300 tons, and so on. Ships of combined materials use the average AR and MC (rounded to the most advantageous value), and the worst saving throws of the materials involved.

Material        Base Cost       AR      MC      Base Time       Repair Cost     General Availability
Bone            1,000 sp        10      D       .25 day         x2/3            Uncommon (20%)
Leather         1,500 sp        9       D       .5 day          x1              Uncommon (20%)
Wood, Thin      500 sp          10      B       1 day           x1              Common (65%)
Wood, Thick     1,000 sp        9       C       1 day           x1              Common (65%)
Ceramic         2,000 sp        9       C       2 days          x1/2            Very rare (4%)
Crystal         5,000 sp        8       C       2 days          x1              Rare (11%)
Metal           3,000 sp        7       D       2 days          x1              Uncommon (20%)
Stone           2,000 sp        6       E       2 days          x2              Common (65%)
Base MC Modifiers
Ship is over 60 tons:   -1 MC
Ship is under 5 tons:   +1 MC

Base Minimum Crew Size: One sailor for every 10 tons of ship (round down), plus one officer for every 10 sailors (round up), plus one helmsman.

Base Cargo Space: Half the ship's tonnage.

General Limits
                Tonnage Crew    MC      Landing AR      Cargo Space
Minimums        1/4     1       F/-3    No/No   10/-2   -100%
Maximums        200*    +300%   A/+3**  Yes/Yes 0/+7    +100%

* Larger ships can certainly be build, but for simplicity's sake, 200 tons is the maximum for PC designed ships. An NPC ship can be up to 700 tons, provided it is build out of a single piece of material; otherwise it is limited to 200 tons as well.

** Ships greater than 200 tons cannot have positive MC adjustments.

Design Improvements

The DM should check once for every step until a check is failed or the target improvement has been reached. The final improvement equals the number of succesful checks. The results of the design should not be reveiled until the actual ship is put to the t est.

Crew: To crew a spelljamming vessel, the base number of sailors needed is 1 per 10 tons of ship (rounded down). Add to this one officer for every 10 sailors (rounded up), and one helmsman. The total number of crewmembers can be increased by a maximum of 300%, or reduced to a minimum of 1. Adjustments to the crew succeed automatically when desired, but they do affect the ship's chances of MC adjustment as follows: Take the total amount by which the number of crewmembers is adjusted. Divide this number by t

he ship's tonnage. If the crew requirements were reduced, multiply the result by 300 to get the penalty to the MC adjustment chance; if the crew requirements were increased, multiply the result by 150 to get the bonus to the MC adjustment chance.

MC: The base MC can be improved by 1 step at a 45% chance. MC can be improved by a maximum of 2 steps, at a 30% chance per step. One step of targeted AR worsening increases the chance per step by 5%; each step of targeted AR improvement reduces the chance per step by 5%. MC can be kept as it is or worsened by at most 2 steps, to a maximum of F, with a base 100% chance of succes; a failed check results in an additional -1 penalty to MC. Also check for MC worsening if improvement was targeted but failed completely; the ship might wind up with a penalty instead.

AR: The Base AR can be improved by 1 step at a 75% chance. Each step beyond that reduces the chance per step by 5%. AR can be improved by a maximum of 6 steps. Each step of targeted MC reduction increases the chance per step by 10%; each step of targeted MC improvement reduces the chance per step by 10%. Cargo capacity also influences the chance per step (see below). AR can be kept as it is or worsened by one step, to a maximum of 10, with a base 100% chance of succes; a failed check results in an additional -1 penalty to AR. Also check for additional AR worsening if improvement was targeted but failed completely; the ship might wind up with a penalty instead.

Cargo: The base cargo capacity is equal to half the ship's tonnage. It can be increased by a maximum of 100% (thus making the cargo tonnage equal to the ship's tonnage) or reduced to as little as 0 tons. Cargo capacity adjustments succeed automatically when desired, but they do affect the ship's chances of AR adjustment as follows: Take the total amount of tonnage by which the cargo capacity is adjusted. Divide this number by the ship's tonnage. If the cargo capacity was increased, multiply the result by 110 to get the penalty to the AR adjustment chance; if the cargo capacity was reduced, multiply the result by 50 to get the bonus to the AR adjustment chance. Remember that one Cargo Ton equals 1,000 cubic feet, while one Ship's Ton equals 2,700 cubic fee t.

Rams

Before a ram can be used safely, the ship must be structurally reinforced at a cost of 50 sp per ton of ship. If a non-reinforced ship trying to ram makes an attack roll of 2 or less, the ram breaks off, and the ramming ship receives the damage instead of its target.

Ram Type        Cost/Ton of Ship
Blunt           100 sp
Piericing       100 sp
Grappling       200 sp

Standard Armament

Each large weapon installation (aka. weapon pit or battle station) incorporated into the design of a ship adds one time the Base Cost of the hull material to the building cost. Note that a large weapon installation does not include the actual weapon, nor does it influence the ship's tonnage in any way. The maximum number of large weapon installations that can be safely build into a ship is equal to two thirds of the ship's tonnage (round to nearest whole number).

Landing

Assign a percentage chance for the ship's capabilities to succesfully make planetfall (without crashing) on land and water, seperately. Add both scores together, multiply by the ship's tonnage to the second power (the larger the ship, the more bracing it requires to survive planetfall), then multiply by the Base Cost of the hull material, and finally divide the total by 20,000. The result is the number of silver pieces added to the construction cost of the hull to incorporate the desired landing facilities into the design. Thus, a ship of one ton would have to add only 0.5% to its building cost for full landing facilities (100% land and 100% water), while a 200 ton ship would need to double its cost for full landing capabilities on water or land alone.

Design Bonus

Should the shipwright-engineer succeed both his shipwright and engineering proficiency checks by a margin of 5 or more, the ship gains a +1 bonus to both MC and AR. Should only one of the checks succeed by a margin of 5 or more, the ship gains a bonus to either its MC or its AR, but not both (designer's choice). A failed check results in a penalty of -1 on both MC and AR, within limits. Should both checks fail, the chance of scoring a critical hit on the ship improves by one, in additon.

Spelljammer Armaments

Target Size: The smallest creature the war engine can target individually. Smaller creatures can only be hit by means of a Deck Crew Casualty critical hit. Creatures of 5+1 Hit Dice or more who are indirectly hit by a war engine (ie. via a Deck Crew Casualty) receive a saving throw vs. death to avoid damage altogether. All war engines receive a +2 bonus to hit Large creatures, +4 to hit Huge creatures, and +6 versus Gargantuan creatures; this bonus does not apply against ships. If ships are moving relatively to each other, war engines receive an additional -6 penalty to hit any creatures aboard.

Area of Effect: This indicates how many creatures will be affected by a hit (direct and indirect alike).

Misfire: Bombards and cannons that score a misfire have a 15% of exploding. Those that donot explode, become fouled and must be cleaned for 1d3x10 minutes in order to function again.

Ballistas               Light           Medium          Heavy           Lt Dual         Md Dual         Hv Dual
Cost:                   200 sp          300 sp          400 sp          400 sp          600 sp          800 sp
Ranges
- Short:                0 hex           0 hex           0 hex           0 hex           0 hex           0 hex
- Medium (-2):          1 hex           1 hex           1 hex           1 hex           1 hex           1 hex
- Long (-5):            2 hexes         2 hexes         2 hexes         2 hexes         2 hexes         2 hexes
THAC0:                  12              14              17              12 (2x)         14 (2x)         17 (2x)
Critical Hit:           20+             19+             18+             20+ ea.         19+ ea.         18+ ea.
Hull Damage:            -               1d3             1d4+2           -               1d3 ea.         1d4+2 ea.
Personal Damage
- Hit Dice:             1d2             1d3             1d4+2           1d2 ea.         1d3 ea.         1d4+2 ea.
- Area of effect:       1 person        1 section       1 section       1 person ea.    1 section ea.   1 section ea.
- hit points (M/L):     2d6/3d6         3d6/3d8         3d10/3d12       2d6/3d6 ea.     3d6/3d8 ea.     3d10/3d12 ea.
ROF:                    1/2             1/3             1/4             1/2             1/3             1/4
Change Facing:          yes             yes             yes             yes             yes             yes
Crew:                   1               2               4               2               4               7
Target Size:            Any             H               H               Any             H               H
Space:                  1 ton           2 tons          2 tons          1 ton           2 tons          2 tons

Ballistas treat all creatures as if they had a base AC of 10 (ie. before bonuses from Dexterity or magic, and the like are applied).

Bombards                Bombard         Great Bombard
Cost:                   10,000 sp       30,000 sp
Range:                  0-4 hexes       0-8 hexes
THAC0:                  17              19
Critical Hit:           18+             16+
Misfire:                natural 1       natural 1
Hull Damage:            1d6             3d12
Personal Damage
- Hit Dice:             1d6             3d12
- Area of effect:       1d2 sections    1d2 sections
- hit points (M/L):     2d10/2d12       3d10/3d12
ROF:                    1/3             1/4
Change Facing:          no              no
Crew:                   3               5
Target Size:            G               G
Space:                  1 ton           N/A

Bombards normally fire stone balls; bombards firing iron balls gain a +2 attack bonus to hull strikes. Normal bombards can hit creatures harmed by +1 weapons, while great bombards can hit creatures harmed by +2 weapons. Bombard shots are blunt attacks, but they are propelled with enough force to harm creatures otherwise immune to those. A single shot from a normal bombard requires 10 charges of smokepowder; a great bombard requires 20 charges. A great bombard cannot be destroyed by a critical hit. Any critical hit against a ship with bombards or cannons has a 10% chance to ignite the powder magazine, inflicting 2d10x5 hull points of damage. Bombards treat all creatures as if they had a base AC of 0.

Cannons                 Light           Medium          Heavy
Cost:                   10,000 sp       15,000 sp       30,000 sp
Ranges
- Short:                0 hex           0-1 hex         0-1 hex
- Medium (-2):          1-2 hexes       2-3 hexes       2-5 hexes
- Long (-5):            3-5 hexes       4-7 hexes       6-10 hexes
THAC0:                  12              14              17
Critical Hit:           19+             18+             16+
Misfire:                natural 1       natural 1       natural 1
Hull Damage:            1d6             2d12            3d12
Personal Damage:
- Hit Dice:             1d6             2d12            3d12
- Area of effect:       1 section       1 section       1d2 sections
- hit points:           1d12x5          1d12x5          1d12x5
ROF:                    1/3             1/4             1/6
Change Facing:          yes             yes             no
Crew:                   3               4               6
Target Size:            H               H               H
Space:                  1 ton           1 ton           2 tons

Cannons always fire iron balls. Light cannons can hit creatures harmed by +1 weapons. Medium cannons can hit creatures harmed by +2 weapons. Heavy cannons can hit creatures harmed by +3 weapons. Bombard shots are blunt attacks, but they are propelled with enough force to harm creatures otherwise immune to those. A shot from a light cannon requires 10 charges of smokepowder, a medium cannon requires 15 charges, and a heavy cannon requires 20 charges. Any critical hit against a ship with bombards or cannons has a 10% chance to ignite the powder magazine, inflicting 2d10x5 hull points of damage. Cannons treat all creatures as if they had a base AC of 10.

Catapults               Light catapult  Medium catapult Heavy catapult  Trebuchet
Cost:                   250 sp          350 sp          500 sp          750 sp
Range:                  1-2 hexes       1-2 hexes       1-2 hexes       2-3 hexes
THAC0:                  14              15              16              17
Critical Hit:           20+             19+             18+             18+
Hull Damage:            1d2 (-)         1d3+1 (-)       2d4 (-)         4d4 (-)
Personal Damage
- Hit Dice:             1d2 (1d2+1)     1d3+1 (1d3+2)   2d4 (2d4+1)     4d4 (4d4+1)
- Area of effect:       1 section       1 section       1 section       1d2 sections
- hit points:           2d10 (3d10)     3d10 (4d10)     3d10 (4d10)     4d10 (5d10)
ROF:                    1/2             1/3             1/4             1/4
Change Facing:          yes             yes             no              no
Crew:                   1               3               5               8
Target Size:            H (any)         G (any)         G (any)         G (any)
Space:                  1 ton           2 tons          2 tons          4 tons

Statistics between parentheses are for catapults (and trebuchets) using jettison shot. Catapults using jettison shot ignore shield and Dexterity bonuses to armor, but donot ignore armor and cannot do damage to creatures with a base AC of 0 or better. Catapults using jettison shot can never score direct hits even though they can target creatures of any size. Catapults treat all creatures as if they had a base AC of 0.

Fire Projector / Flame Thrower
Cost:                   500
Range:                  0-2 hexes
THAC0:                  16
Critical Hit:           18+
Hull Damage:            6d4, plus a 2d4 point fire on the next round
Personal Damage
- Hit Dice:             6d4
- Area of effect:       1 section
- hit points:           5d10
ROF:                    1/4 rounds
Change Facing:          yes
Crew:                   2
Target Size:            H
Space:                  1 ton

Fire projectors can shoot war oil as far as 2 hexes, though the flames will sniff out the moment they exit the air envelope. Fire projectors donot allow for a saving throws vs. death to escape damage; instead, a succesful saving throw vs. breath weapon halves personal damage. Ships carrying fire projectors are more vulnerable to critical hits; others add +1 to the chance of a critical hit against said ships. Remember that fires inflict 5 Hull Points damage per ship's round for every point of size they have.